>Sophos Shared Post : $100 gift card for the Subway sandwich chain


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FILED UNDER: FeaturedPrivacySocial networksSpam
We’ve received a number of questions from Facebook fans of Sophos regarding messages that have spread across the social network claiming to offer a $100 gift card for the Subway sandwich chain.
Here’s a typical message:
Subway Facebook message
Free Subway Gift Cards - Limited Time
Get Your Free Subway Gift Card Now! Click for Details
So, what’s going on here? Well, the first thing to realise is that it’s not something endorsed by Subway.
Although the link you click through to has no qualms about using Subway’s logo, and images of meals you can purchase at Subway, it’s actually from an independent third party company.
Subway gift card webpage
Many people will probably be so keen to receive $100 worth of Subway meals that they won’t read the small print at the bottom of the page:
The above listed merchants or brands in no way endorse or sponsor FreeGiftCardSon.us's offer and are not liable for any alleged or actual claims related to this offer. The above listed trademarks and service marks are the marks of their respective owners.
FreeGiftCardSon.us is solely responsible for all Gift fulfillment. In order to receive your gift you must: (1) Meet the eligibility requirements (2) complete the rewards bonus survey (3) complete a total of 5 Sponsor Offers as stated in the Gift Rules (4) not cancel your participation in more than a total of 2 Sponsor Offers within 30 days of any Sponsor Offer Sign-Up Date as outlined in the Gift Rules (the Cancellation Limit) and (5) follow the redemption instructions.
The pages ask you some simple and apparently harmless questions: are you male or female, which age group do you fall into, etc.. before asking for your email address.
Subway gift card spam wants your email address
At this point the page tells you that you must post the message onto your Facebook page in order to qualify for the free $100 Subway gift card.
In this way the message is spread virally to your Facebook friends.
But there’s still no sign of your free Subway gift card, because the site now wants you to hand over much more personal information, including your name, address, email address, full date of birth, cellphone and telephone number etc.
Form asks for your personal details
Again, notice that the webpage doesn’t seem to have any issue with using the Subway logo – despite not being affiliated with Subway. Clearly this is done in an attempt to trick Facebook users into believing that they are talking directly to the high street brand.
According to the small print, you’ll have to complete multiple “sponsor offers” before they will even consider sending you a gift card – which may cost you both in time and money, but also the sheer treasure trove of personal information you will have handed over.
My advice? Avoid these “offers” as they’re unlikely to ever prove fruitful, and may result in you handing over a wealth of data about yourself to complete strangers. When you agree to post a message about such gift cards on Facebook, you are putting your online friends at risk of having their privacy damaged too.
If you use Facebook and want to learn more about spam, malware, scams and other threats, you should join the Sophos Facebook page where we have a thriving community of over 80,000 people.

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>Photo tagged as a Facebook bunnygirl? Beware viral scam


>

FILED UNDER: PrivacySocial networksSpam
Facebook bunnygirlFacebook users, both male and female, are finding that they have been tagged in a photo of a young woman dressed as a bunnygirl.
But this isn’t an early homage to the Easter Bunny, this is an attempt to get unsuspecting Facebook users to click on a scam link offering to reveal who has been stalking them on the social network.
And in a change from their normal tactics, scammers are exploiting Facebook’s loosely-controlled photo tagging capability to get their messages in front of as many people as possible.
Your first encounter with this scam is likely to be when you log into Facebook one morning, and discover that one of your friends appears to have tagged you in a photograph. Imagine your surprise when you discover it’s not you at all, but a photograph of a woman dressed as a Playboy bunnygirl waitress.
Furthermore, you may see that your Facebook friend has also tagged other contacts of theirs as being the bunnygirl as well.
Facebook bunnygirl photo album
There clearly aren’t that many people in that photo. After all, where would she hide them all in that skimpy outfit?
No. Instead, the truth is that whoever was responsible for posting the image wants you to click on a link.
A link which typically reads:
wow this works >> [LINK] << now you can see who your top facebook profile stalkers are!
Regular readers of Naked Security will already be smelling a rat, but no doubt some Facebook users would be curious enough to venture further into the trap.
And if you do make the mistake of clicking on the link (bit.ly, by the way has closed down the links that Sophos has seen being used so far, but the scammers are now using other urls which don’t rely on the url-shortening service) then they will be taken to a webpage like this:
Who are your top stalkers?
Now, many Facebook users are extremely eager to discover who has been checking out their Facebook profile and will think nothing of approving the third-party application that they are presented with:
Rogue Facebook application
Of course, this is a big mistake. The rogue application can now access your Facebook profile, and post messages in your name and even create photo albums of bunnygirls, tagged with the names of your Facebook friends. And in this way the scam spreads virally across the social network.
Bunnygirl photo update on compromised Facebook account
They don’t even apologise for never revealing who your top Facebook profile stalkers are. Scammers, you just can’t trust them..
If you’ve been hit by a scam like this, revoke the rogue application’s access rights and delete the offending photo album.
Unfortunately, for reasons best known to itself, Facebook doesn’t allow you to stop people (and applications) from tagging photos with your name in the first place.
This feels to me like a basic privacy option that is essential for Facebook, but there’s no sign that they’re going to add it anytime soon. In fact, they’re introducing a technology which will automatically tag photographs using facial recognition software. Yuck.
You can learn more about how to best configure Facebook’s settings to protect your privacy in our online guide.
If you don’t want to get caught out again, or simply want to learn more about security threats on the social network and elsewhere on the internet, I would strongly recommend you join the Sophos Facebook page where we provide early warnings about such attacks.
Hat tip: Thanks to Naked Security reader Darren who sent us a tip about this scam, bringing it to our attention.

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>Radiation text message is fake – Fake BBC email scares Asia


>

Source: www.bbc.co.uk



A fake text message warning people that radiation from the Fukushima nuclear plant has leaked beyond Japan has been panicking people across Asia.
The SMS message, purporting to come from the BBC, has been circulating around Asian countries since Monday.
It warns people to take necessary precautions against possible effects of radiation.
The BBC has issued no such flash but the hoax has caused particular panic in the Philippines.
Some media reports suggest that workers and school children there were sent home after the rumours began to spread, prompting the Philippines government to issue an official denial.
Disasters such as that currently unfolding in Japan often trigger a rise in scam texts and e-mails intended to fool users into downloading malware or simply to spread panic.
The US Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) has told computer users to be wary of potential e-mail scams, as well as fake anti-virus and phishing attacks regarding the Japan earthquake and the tsunami disasters.
“Such scams may contain links or attachments which direct users to phishing or malware-laden sites,” it said.
In the Philippines, the Department of Science and Technology has held a press conference to reassure the public that they are safe even if radiation levels in Japan continue to rise.
On Tuesday morning, reactor 2 at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant became the third to explode in four days.
Radiation has reached harmful levels but there is no suggestion that it is affecting anything other than the immediate area.
Officials have extended the danger zone, warning residents within 30km (18 miles) to evacuate or stay indoors.



FAKE E-MAIL IN FULL

BBC Flash news : Japan Government confirms radiation leak at Fukushima nuclear plants. Asian countries should take necessary precautions. If rain comes, remain indoors first 24 hours. Close doors and windows. Swab neck skin with betadine where thyroid area is, radiation hits thyroid first. Take extra precautions. Radiation may hit Philippine at around 4 pm today. If it rains today or in the next few days in Hong Kong. Do not go under the rain. If you get caught out, use an umbrella or raincoat, even if it is only a drizzle. Radioactive particles, which may cause burns, alopecia or even cancer, may be in the rain.

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Radiation text message is fake – Fake BBC email scares Asia


Source: www.bbc.co.uk



A fake text message warning people that radiation from the Fukushima nuclear plant has leaked beyond Japan has been panicking people across Asia.
The SMS message, purporting to come from the BBC, has been circulating around Asian countries since Monday.
It warns people to take necessary precautions against possible effects of radiation.
The BBC has issued no such flash but the hoax has caused particular panic in the Philippines.
Some media reports suggest that workers and school children there were sent home after the rumours began to spread, prompting the Philippines government to issue an official denial.
Disasters such as that currently unfolding in Japan often trigger a rise in scam texts and e-mails intended to fool users into downloading malware or simply to spread panic.
The US Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) has told computer users to be wary of potential e-mail scams, as well as fake anti-virus and phishing attacks regarding the Japan earthquake and the tsunami disasters.
“Such scams may contain links or attachments which direct users to phishing or malware-laden sites,” it said.
In the Philippines, the Department of Science and Technology has held a press conference to reassure the public that they are safe even if radiation levels in Japan continue to rise.
On Tuesday morning, reactor 2 at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant became the third to explode in four days.
Radiation has reached harmful levels but there is no suggestion that it is affecting anything other than the immediate area.
Officials have extended the danger zone, warning residents within 30km (18 miles) to evacuate or stay indoors.



FAKE E-MAIL IN FULL

BBC Flash news : Japan Government confirms radiation leak at Fukushima nuclear plants. Asian countries should take necessary precautions. If rain comes, remain indoors first 24 hours. Close doors and windows. Swab neck skin with betadine where thyroid area is, radiation hits thyroid first. Take extra precautions. Radiation may hit Philippine at around 4 pm today. If it rains today or in the next few days in Hong Kong. Do not go under the rain. If you get caught out, use an umbrella or raincoat, even if it is only a drizzle. Radioactive particles, which may cause burns, alopecia or even cancer, may be in the rain.

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>How to use Facebook’s OpenGraph API to spread Malware


>

How to use Facebook’s OpenGraph API to spread Malware

by David Michmerhuizen – Security Researcher
If you’re a regular Facebook user, you’re used to questionable links in your friend feed.  Links to apps you don’t want to run.  Links to quizzes you don’t want to take.  Links to cause pages you don’t care about.  Links to videos you probably shouldn’t look at.  They spread by tricking you to press ‘like’ or ‘add’ before they show you what they offer.
All typical stuff, except that Barracuda Labs has seen something unusual in the first week of March – a huge “likejacking” campaign that has fooled many otherwise careful Facebook users and illustrated  just how a truly serious malware attack could leverage the Open Graph API to spread virally through Facebook.
While likejacking is not new, this campaign is particularly well done.  It succeeds because clicking on video links on your friend feed is a very natural thing to do.   More than a few of our otherwise tech-savvy friends (who should know better) were taken in by this scam.  It starts with a link in your friend feed from someone you trust…
Malicious post in Friend Feed

Malicious post in Friend Feed
The post appears to be a link to a video, nothing unusual.  Clicking on it takes you off from Facebook onto a domain that presents a page very similar to a YouTube video, except with a logo that reads “FouTube”…
Fake "FouTube" page

Fake “FouTube” page
The site combines HTML and Javascript with special Facebook-specific markup to create a large ‘like’ button that looks like a video playback window.   The markup is Facebook’s Open Graph API, and it is used to tell Facebook that the scam site (girl-gets-caught.info) should be added to Facebook’s “social graph” just as if it were a page from the Facebook site.
Open Graph API Markup

Open Graph API Markup
It bears repeating – a ‘like’ button is implemented in code.  The only thing that makes one look like the usual Facebook ‘like’ button is Facebook’s Terms of Service, which state that a ‘like’ button must use an approved style.
The code you see here has two functions.
First, as shown below, is to ‘like’ the page so that a link to it appears on your wall and in the friend feed of all of your friends. This spreads the campaign virally and with if the subject videos are appealing enough the links to the scam page can spread to many thousands of users in a very short time.
Malicious HTML and JavaScript

Malicious HTML and JavaScript
Indeed, clicking on the video posts a link to the scam page on Renee’s wall
The scam posted to your Facebook wall

The scam posted to your Facebook wall
The second function of the code is the true aim of the campaign, which is to direct visitors to a series of ’surveys’ which indiscriminately pitch products, harvest personal information and attempt to subscribe the unwary to premium-rate SMS services.  This is where the scammers make their money.
The start of the scam surveys

The start of the scam surveys
(More survey scam pictures herehere, and here. )   If you wait for 60 seconds the underlying page continues on to display a relevant YouTube video.
A partial list of domains involved (careful, some may still be active) shows the effort that went into the social engineering aspects of the campaign.
domains used

Partial list of domains used
This sort of likejacking has been going on for quite awhile, and the campaigns are almost always used to deliver users to ’survey’ sites.  In the case of the fake video page described above the survey poses as a hurdle to pass to be allowed to see the video.  The survey itself is generally harmless provided that you don’t answer it, and the Facebook ‘like’ is embarrassing but easy enough to fix.  Facebook removes these posts after the fact, usually within hours.
The example above shows that Open Graph gives survey distributors easy access to Facebook, turning a low-level scam spread via email and forum spam into a huge viral success for the scammers.
What is especially troubling about this is what could have happened.  Rather than deliver a scammy survey, malware distributors could easily attempt a series of silent exploits against the browser and it’s plug-ins, followed by a quick redirect to a real video.    That sort of attack could spread real malware such as the Zeus or SpyEye password-stealing trojans to thousands of Facebook users in a very short period of time compared to other methods.    Even worse, many of those backdoors and password stealers would be installed inside of business networks who allow their employees to use Facebook in their ‘free time’.

Barracuda Networks recommends you take particular care when using facebook.  If friends post links, make sure you trust the destination domain before following the link.  Barracuda Web Filters also allow the selective blocking of Facebook within the organization.

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How to use Facebook’s OpenGraph API to spread Malware


How to use Facebook’s OpenGraph API to spread Malware

by David Michmerhuizen – Security Researcher
If you’re a regular Facebook user, you’re used to questionable links in your friend feed.  Links to apps you don’t want to run.  Links to quizzes you don’t want to take.  Links to cause pages you don’t care about.  Links to videos you probably shouldn’t look at.  They spread by tricking you to press ‘like’ or ‘add’ before they show you what they offer.
All typical stuff, except that Barracuda Labs has seen something unusual in the first week of March – a huge “likejacking” campaign that has fooled many otherwise careful Facebook users and illustrated  just how a truly serious malware attack could leverage the Open Graph API to spread virally through Facebook.
While likejacking is not new, this campaign is particularly well done.  It succeeds because clicking on video links on your friend feed is a very natural thing to do.   More than a few of our otherwise tech-savvy friends (who should know better) were taken in by this scam.  It starts with a link in your friend feed from someone you trust…
Malicious post in Friend Feed

Malicious post in Friend Feed
The post appears to be a link to a video, nothing unusual.  Clicking on it takes you off from Facebook onto a domain that presents a page very similar to a YouTube video, except with a logo that reads “FouTube”…

Fake “FouTube” page
The site combines HTML and Javascript with special Facebook-specific markup to create a large ‘like’ button that looks like a video playback window.   The markup is Facebook’s Open Graph API, and it is used to tell Facebook that the scam site (girl-gets-caught.info) should be added to Facebook’s “social graph” just as if it were a page from the Facebook site.
Open Graph API Markup

Open Graph API Markup
It bears repeating – a ‘like’ button is implemented in code.  The only thing that makes one look like the usual Facebook ‘like’ button is Facebook’s Terms of Service, which state that a ‘like’ button must use an approved style.
The code you see here has two functions.
First, as shown below, is to ‘like’ the page so that a link to it appears on your wall and in the friend feed of all of your friends. This spreads the campaign virally and with if the subject videos are appealing enough the links to the scam page can spread to many thousands of users in a very short time.
Malicious HTML and JavaScript

Malicious HTML and JavaScript
Indeed, clicking on the video posts a link to the scam page on Renee’s wall
The scam posted to your Facebook wall

The scam posted to your Facebook wall
The second function of the code is the true aim of the campaign, which is to direct visitors to a series of ’surveys’ which indiscriminately pitch products, harvest personal information and attempt to subscribe the unwary to premium-rate SMS services.  This is where the scammers make their money.
The start of the scam surveys

The start of the scam surveys
(More survey scam pictures herehere, and here. )   If you wait for 60 seconds the underlying page continues on to display a relevant YouTube video.
A partial list of domains involved (careful, some may still be active) shows the effort that went into the social engineering aspects of the campaign.
domains used

Partial list of domains used
This sort of likejacking has been going on for quite awhile, and the campaigns are almost always used to deliver users to ’survey’ sites.  In the case of the fake video page described above the survey poses as a hurdle to pass to be allowed to see the video.  The survey itself is generally harmless provided that you don’t answer it, and the Facebook ‘like’ is embarrassing but easy enough to fix.  Facebook removes these posts after the fact, usually within hours.
The example above shows that Open Graph gives survey distributors easy access to Facebook, turning a low-level scam spread via email and forum spam into a huge viral success for the scammers.
What is especially troubling about this is what could have happened.  Rather than deliver a scammy survey, malware distributors could easily attempt a series of silent exploits against the browser and it’s plug-ins, followed by a quick redirect to a real video.    That sort of attack could spread real malware such as the Zeus or SpyEye password-stealing trojans to thousands of Facebook users in a very short period of time compared to other methods.    Even worse, many of those backdoors and password stealers would be installed inside of business networks who allow their employees to use Facebook in their ‘free time’.

Barracuda Networks recommends you take particular care when using facebook.  If friends post links, make sure you trust the destination domain before following the link.  Barracuda Web Filters also allow the selective blocking of Facebook within the organization.

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RIP Charlie Sheen found Dead at his House!


Source : Facecrooks

Scam Signature MessageRIP Charlie Sheen found Dead at his House! walrunfur.info
sheendead_wall

Scam Type: Survey Scam – Malware
Trending: March 2011
Why it’s a Scam:
Once you click on the Wall Post link, you are taken to the following page:
sheeddead_main

This FbVideo page is designed to look like a YouTube channel. If you click anywhere on the screen your Facebook account will be “click-jacked,” and you will be spreading the spam message via your Facebook news feed. Clicking to play the video will also take you to the following screen:
sheendead_survey

The scammers have gotten lazy on this one. Usually there will be a Facebook application to install, or a request to “like” and “share” the page. This one goes straight for the end game right out of the gate. We didn’t test the games or downloads out, but some users are reporting malware infestation after falling for this scam


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Directory of Bonus Checkers & Cheater Apps for Facebook Games


Thanks for sharing

Shared Post from 
Directory of Bonus Checkers & Cheater Apps for Facebook Games
(***Find out who among your friends are using the Cheats!***)
By BJ Shakespeare

I have compiled a comprehensive “Directory of Bonus Checkers & Cheater Apps” in order to help my Game Friends to find out who on their friends list is using Bonus Checkers or Cheater Apps.

Personally, I have No Need for so called Friends or Neighbors that use those Bonus Checkers or Cheater Apps. I don’t know why people can’t get their game bonuses the old fashioned way… Like look through the wall posts like everyone else does.

Did you ever happen to think about what you could miss out on by not looking through the entire wall postings? You miss out on seeing people as Individuals. You miss out on when someone is having a Great Day or maybe someone is having a hard time & could use a kind word.
People who use a bonus checker may as well post a status that says the following….”I don’t care at all about anyone. All I want is my game bonuses!” 
~ BJ Shakespeare 2010

—————————————————————————
I usually try to contact the person to inform them they are on the list of people using the Bonus Checker or Cheater App. Giving them the opportunity to stop using the app & Remove themselves from the Application Users List. Below is an example of the message I may send them.

EXAMPLE:

Hello Friend,

I’m not sure if you realize or not, But you are listed as a “Listed User of ____________ (Name of Bonus Checker or Cheater App) I am giving you the opportunity to remove yourself from the Application.

I value all my Game Friends. And I would prefer not to lose you as one of my Game Friends. But, I am planning to start removing people that continue to remain on the Bonus Checker & Cheater App lists.

I hope to see you removed from the listed users of any and all of the Bonus Checker & Cheater App Users Lists.

Sincerely,

________________________

Your Game Friend

*********************************************

Directory of Bonus Checkers & Cheater Apps for Facebook Games
By: BJ Shakespeare 2010

NAME OF GAME or APPLICATION (In Alphabetical Order)
SOME GAMES HAVE MORE THAN 1 BONUS CHECKER!

Simply scroll through the following links to find the game(s) you wish to check. It will show any friends you have that are using the application.

DO NOT CLICK “Like” ON ANY OF THE PAGES LISTED BELOW.

Or it will list YOU as a User of the Bonus Checker / Cheater App !!!

* All Game BC
 http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=108940189145614&v=info

* Backyard Monsters

http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=164677630225803&v=info

* Baking Life
 http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=106126662773243&v=info

* Bejeweled Blitz
 http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=116831848371089#!/apps/application.php?id=116831848371089&v=info

* Cafe World
 http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=104785242901728&v=info&ref=ts

* Cafe World #2
 http://www.facebook.com/search.php?q=bonus+checker&type=all&init=srp#!/apps/application.php?id=217700022703&v=info

* Car Town
 http://www.facebook.com/search.php?q=bonus+checker&type=all&init=srp#!/apps/application.php?id=132481800133672&v=info

* Castle Age
 http://www.facebook.com/search.php?q=bonus+checker&type=all&init=srp#!/apps/application.php?id=103578036375294&v=info

* CityVille
 http://www.facebook.com/search.php?q=bonus+checker&type=all&init=srp#!/apps/application.php?id=166937376679663&v=info

* CityVille #2
 http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=182199418460141#!/apps/application.php?id=182199418460141&v=info

* City of Wonder
 http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=151835764840338#!/apps/application.php?id=151835764840338&v=info

* Country Life
 http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=114091235300515#!/apps/application.php?id=114091235300515&v=info

* Country Story
 http://www.facebook.com/search.php?q=bonus+checker&type=all&init=srp#!/apps/application.php?id=134695223246287&v=info

* Crime City
 http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=127817190611709#!/apps/application.php?id=127817190611709&v=info

* Family Feud
 http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=133550000015631#!/apps/application.php?id=133550000015631&v=info

* Farm Bonuses    ( “NEW” )
http://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/apps/application.php?id=107098239066&v=info

* FarmVille
 http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=175804218660&ref=ts#!/apps/application.php?id=175804218660&v=info

* FarmVille #2
 http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=122916407733022&v=info

* FV bonus checker
http://www.facebook.com/social_graph.php?node_id=175804218660&class=AppUserManager&edge_type=mutual

* Fashion World
 http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=164783806880873#!/apps/application.php?id=164783806880873&v=info

* Fifa Superstars
 http://www.facebook.com/search.php?flt=1&q=bonus&s=10&type=apps#!/apps/application.php?id=119857958069862&v=info

* Fish World
 http://www.facebook.com/search.php?q=bonus+checker&type=all&init=srp#!/apps/application.php?id=244393673291&v=info

* FishVille
 http://www.facebook.com/search.php?q=bonus+checker&type=all&init=srp#!/apps/application.php?id=401534655093&v=info

* FrontierVille
 http://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/apps/application.php?id=100482493337091&v=info&ref=ts

* GAMERS UNITE
 http://www.facebook.com/social_graph.php?node_id=222868257269&class=AppUserManager&edge_type=mutual&ref=mf

* Happy Aquarium
 http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=281461561048#!/apps/application.php?id=281461561048&v=info

* Happy Island
 http://www.facebook.com/search.php?q=bonus+checker&type=all&init=srp#!/apps/application.php?id=102712163103550&v=info

* Hello City
 http://www.facebook.com/search.php?q=bonus+checker&init=quick&tas=0.8098749319571142#!/apps/application.php?id=117497378297955&v=info

* Hollywood City
 http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=180739581940672&v=info

* Hotel City
 http://www.facebook.com/search.php?q=bonus+checker&init=quick&tas=0.8098749319571142#!/apps/application.php?id=132348566789195&v=info

* Island Paradise
 http://www.facebook.com/search.php?q=bonus+checker&type=all&init=srp#!/apps/application.php?id=134341273262309&v=info

* It Girl
 http://www.facebook.com/search.php?q=bonus+checker&type=all&init=srp#!/apps/application.php?id=148851878484590&v=info

* Kingdoms of Camelot
 http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=154933694532695#!/apps/application.php?id=154933694532695&v=info

* Mafia Wars
 http://www.facebook.com/search.php?q=bonus+checker&type=all&init=srp#!/apps/application.php?id=198656634540&v=info

* Mall World
 http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=153311991353338#!/apps/application.php?id=153311991353338&v=info

* Market Street
 http://www.facebook.com/search/?flt=1&q=bonus&o=128&s=30#!/apps/application.php?id=108788685844858&ref=search

* Market Street #2
 http://www.facebook.com/search/?flt=1&q=bonus&o=128&s=30#!/apps/application.php?id=163738663641207&ref=search

* Monster World
 http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=162397157121212#!/apps/application.php?id=162397157121212&v=info

* My Empire
 http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=133682706667026#!/apps/application.php?id=133682706667026&v=info

* Nightclub City
 http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=104258789629546#!/apps/application.php?id=104258789629546&v=info

* Ninja Saga
 http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=139981559360225#!/apps/application.php?id=139981559360225&v=info

* Pet Society
 http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=245506374012#!/apps/application.php?id=245506374012&v=info

* PetVille
 http://www.facebook.com/search.php?flt=1&q=bonus&s=10&type=apps#!/apps/application.php?id=231668863757&v=info

* Pirate Ahoy
 http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=150062085025466#!/apps/application.php?id=150062085025466&v=info

* Ravenwood Fair
 http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=173482309338388#!/apps/application.php?id=173482309338388&v=info

* Resort World
 http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=164656330226679#!/apps/application.php?id=164656330226679&v=info

* Simply Hospital
 http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=122282194502500#!/apps/application.php?id=122282194502500&v=info

* Sorority
 http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=452482345606#!/apps/application.php?id=452482345606&v=info

* Texas HoldEm Poker
 http://www.facebook.com/search.php?q=bonus+checker&init=quick&tas=0.8098749319571142#!/apps/application.php?id=129283130433235&v=info

* Tiki Resort
 http://www.facebook.com/search.php?flt=1&q=bonus&s=10&type=apps#!/apps/application.php?id=162533900431347&v=info

* Treasure Isle
 http://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/apps/application.php?id=114602315217428&v=info&ref=ts

* Vampire Wars
 http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=103444026372312#!/apps/application.php?id=103444026372312&v=info

* Warstorm
 http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=127714323955059&v=info

* Wild Ones
 http://www.facebook.com/search.php?q=bonus+checker&type=all&init=srp#!/apps/application.php?id=103556046378553&v=info

* YoVille
 http://www.facebook.com/search.php?flt=1&q=bonus&s=10&type=apps#!/apps/application.php?id=199273991591&v=info

* Zoo Paradise
 http://www.facebook.com/search.php?q=bonus+checker&type=all&init=srp#!/apps/application.php?id=107268992665536&v=info

* Zoo World
 http://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/apps/application.php?id=286802837624&v=info&ref=search

WARNING: Don’t Click ‘Overpopulated’ Posts On Facebook


Shared from http://www.allfacebook.com

WARNING: Don’t Click ‘Overpopulated’ Posts On Facebook

The latest scamware circulating on Facebook refrains aspects of a chain message from last month, only this time around malware accompanies the message: an erroneous warning that the site will close inactive accounts and asking people to verify they’re active.

Clicking on the link to verify your account starts a download of “view_your_problem” that introduces malware to your machine. a permission window, and if you click “allow,” the application takes you to a page offering a choice of six marketing surveys that all promise discounts and prizes, but only make a commission for the spammer if you complete the questionnaire.
And while the scamware takes you to the survey pages on a website away from Facebook, the app makes two posts to your wall. One of them warns about overpopulation and the other confirms that you’ve verified your account. Your friends’ walls might be spared from additional spam if you don’t make it all the way to the end of the survey.
Like our friends at Facecrooks point out, if you’ve already clicked “allow” so that this application could download onto your machine, delete all signs of it from your account. That means clicking on the x’s next to both posts on your wall, and then removing the app — click on the “account” link in the upper right hand corner of any page on the site, then click on “privacy settings” in the drop-down menu, and so on.
Readers, have you seen any posts on your contacts’ news feeds warning about so-called overpopulation? And has anyone reported this scamware to Facebook yet?

 
Scareware 
Defined – Scareware comprises several classes of scam software with malicious payloads, or of limited or no benefit, that are sold to consumers via certain unethical marketing practices. The selling approach uses social engineering to cause shock, anxiety, or the perception of a threat, generally directed at an unsuspecting user. Some forms of spyware and adware also use scareware tactics.

 

Rogue Application:


Defined – There are weaknesses in facebook that allow unscrupulous facebook application developers access to your facebook information and to use your facebook account as a means to spread a fake viral message/ad across facebook. Once you install a rogue app it does not function as promised. It instead mines your data and/or spam’s your wall in an attempt to spread itself to your friends and throughout facebook.

 

Facebook Clean Up
You need to be aware that if you have installed any bad apps into your facebook profile or clicked any clickjacked or likejacked links within facebook, you may be currently spamming your wall and or your friends news feeds with the apps or links viral/scam messages. If this has occurred you must remove the messages from your wall by deleting the post and or remove the rogue app by uninstalling it from your facebook profile.

How to remove an Application from your profile:
If you have made the mistake of following thru with the install of a rogue application, Please do the following:
  1. Navigate to your Privacy settings- (Click Account, then “Privacy Settings”).
  2. Then under the heading “Applications, Games, and Websites” click “Edit Settings”.
  3. To the right of the heading “Applications You Use” Click the “Edit Settings” button.
  4. Finally find the application name in your list and click the “Little X” to the right of that name. Follow the facebook prompt to remove the app.
What to do if you’ve downloaded Software to your Computer
If you have followed one of the links on facebook to an external website or downloaded a piece of software you are unsure of and believe you may have got a virus infection, I suggest you immediately uninstall any software you may have installed, then run a virus check on your system.


Damage Control written by Mr. Black Knight (Co-admin BDE) Owner   ───► Scam Sniper ◄─── 


Tip: If you follow these 10 facebook anti-hacked commandments, you will be less vulnerable to having your facebook account hacked.


1. Never give out your facebook user name & password.
2. Keep the email address associated with your facebook account under lock and key.
3. Use strong passwords.
4. Don’t click links while on facebook or other web locations indiscriminately.
5. Don’t follow any emails to facebook.
6. Make sure you are logging onto http://www.facebook.com
7. Don’t accept every friend request sent your way.
8. Do not leave your computer on with your Facebook account open.
9. Be sure to have a fully working and Up-To-Date anti virus software on your computer.
10. Share these commandments with everyone on facebook.

Digging up worms: a darker side to social networks. – AVG Blogs


From AVG Blogs

Digging up worms: a darker side to social networks.

Worm AVG Threat Labs gives users the ability to examine exactly what threats are lurking out there on the web. By simply entering a website’s URL, anyone can get an instant report detailing the site’s threat history and therefore its trustworthiness.
If you have already used this great free tool then you’ll have seen the initial site rating report i.e. “POPULAR”, “VERY POPULAR”, “TOP SITE” – as well as the information on the location of their server, the number of threats found and the number of compromised web pages.
Where live threats lurk.
You may be surprised to learn that worms (the nasty computer kind) are finding ways to spread quickly across both Facebook, Twitter and beyond. The Facebook Worm (1403) spreads by using Facebook wall posts and status updates that harbour a link that, if clicked, will infect a user’s system with spam, malware and/or a phishing attack. 
Here are the signs of potential danger:

  1. The URL is auto-shortened to hide its full length and origin and is linking to a site external to Facebook
  2. The post uses the acronym lmao – “laughing my arse off” – but it is a generic post and not directed to you personally. This should warn of potential danger.
  3. The subject matter offers humor and funny images – a common “lure” for spam.
  4. As with most things, common sense is the best tool in staying while social networking. 

Read more AVG Blogs | On Social Media http://twitter.blog.avg.com/2011/02/digging-up-worms-a-darker-side-to-social-networks.html#ixzz1E35nqJYT
Free Antivirus

The BULLDOG Estate  Tips: If you follow these 10 facebook anti-hacked commandments, you will be less vulnerable to having your facebook account hacked.


1. Never give out your facebook user name & password.
2. Keep the email address associated with your facebook account under lock and key.
3. Use strong passwords.
4. Don’t click links while on facebook or other web locations indiscriminately.
5. Don’t follow any emails to facebook.
6. Make sure you are logging onto http://www.facebook.com
7. Don’t accept every friend request sent your way.
8. Do not leave your computer on with your Facebook account open.
9. Be sure to have a fully working and Up-To-Date anti virus software on your computer.
10. Share these commandments with everyone on facebook.

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