When the Kids Are Away, the Scammers Come Out to Play


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When the Kids Are Away, the Scammers Come Out to Play
MoneyGram Offers Advice to Parents of College Spring Breakers
To Avoid Fraud During Popular Travel Period


DALLAS (Feb. 22, 2012) – While most Americans will prepare to lose an hour of sleep when Daylight Saving Time ends in mid-March, many parents are preparing to lose something else:  their peace of mind when their college-age children travel on spring break.

According to MoneyGram (NYSE: MGI), a leading global money transfer company, spring break can end up “breaking the bank” if parents don’t stay alert to the “family scam” – when a scammer calls parents to inform them their child is in trouble in a distant location, asking for money for medical care or bail, even though the child is perfectly safe.

“Spring break can be a letting-go experience for parents of college students,” said Kim Garner, Senior Vice President of Global Security for MoneyGram..  “But along with letting go, parents should hang on to their common sense, especially when it comes to helping their kids stay safe and avoid certain common scams.”

Garner offers the following advice to parents of college students to safeguard their physical and financial health during spring break:

Ø  Check in before heading out:  American students traveling internationally can register with the U.S. State Department’s free Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, which will help with communications in the event of an emergency.  Canadian students can register with their country’s similar program, Registration of Canadians Abroad.

Ø  Take a lesson from E.T.: Phone home:  Parents should make a deal with their students traveling for spring break – a little freedom for a few phone calls and some extra phone numbers.  Parents should establish specific times for phone calls to check in, so they will know where their students are and what they’re up to, and get cell phone numbers for the friends of their traveling children as a back-up means of communication.

Ø  Just say no:  With personal belongings left scattered on beach towels, scammers often will use student IDs to find parents and ask for money to be wired in the aid of their child who can’t come to the phone.  Garner of MoneyGram advises parents to say no – and never wire money to anyone they don’t know – instead checking in by calling the child’s cell phone or the local authorities where their child is vacationing.

Ø  Give them credit:  Parents can temporarily add a child as an approved user to a credit card, and place a pre-set spending limit on the card as a way to prompt financial responsibility while the student is traveling.

Ø  Put a policy in place:  To guard against a financial loss, parents should check with their insurance company to make sure their child’s possessions are insured on their homeowner’s policy while the student is traveling, especially if the child will be traveling outside the United States.
“The best way to ensure a safe spring break and avoid a scam is to talk to your child in advance about these types of precautions, and schedule regular contact so you can hear directly from them that they’re safe,” said Garner of MoneyGram.  “And while the student is traveling, parents should focus on their own protection against scams by never sending money to anyone they don’t know, regardless of what the individual on the other end of a phone might be telling them.”

As part of MoneyGram’s ongoing efforts to protect consumers from wire transfer fraud, the company recently launched an enhanced version of its fraud prevention website – www.moneygram-preventfraud.com.  MoneyGram recommends that before initiating a money transfer, consumers should:

·         Know – Always know the person to whom you are sending money.  Never send money to strangers.
·         Show – Never show or share information about your money transfer to anyone but the recipient. 
·         Throw – Discard or throw away any offers that promise easy ways to earn money, especially if the offers require you to send money before earning money.

Consumers who suspect fraud associated with money transfers should contact their local law enforcement.  Consumers should call 1-800-MONEYGRAM (800-666-3947) if they believe MoneyGram was used to wire money as a result of a scam.

About MoneyGram International
MoneyGram International, a leading money transfer company, enables consumers who are not fully served by traditional financial institutions to meet their financial needs. MoneyGram offers bill payment services in the United States and Canada and money transfer services worldwide through a global network of more than 267,000 agent locations — including retailers, international post offices and financial institutions — in 192 countries and territories. To learn more about money transfer or bill payment at an agent location or online, please visit http://www.moneygram.com or connect with us on Facebook.

Media Contact:
Christy French
214-379-3703


Help Topic – The Learning Curve – How to Spot and Avoid Fake Video & News Scams on Facebook.


This article has been written for those who want to learn how to Spot and Avoid fake video and news scams on Facebook. It’s is not made to detail any one specific viral scam, but to give you the basic information needed to avoid most if not all fake video and news scams on Facebook. By today’s standards it is considered a bit long, lol, but if you are really serious about avoiding these types of scams and have very little to no experience on Facebook and the web, you should sit back, relax and have a read.. Even if you are savvy there is something in here for you too, I bet. I hope, you find this article helpful to you and your friends.

Facebook suffers a constant onslaught of fake celebrity sex-tapes, stories, bogus world news events, viral prank and other questionable video links. These video links often present themselves as legit to Facebook users with unseasoned eyes and very little if any computer experience. What makes it even worse is that Scam artists have learned to use the “trust” factor as the main method for duping people into clicking these links and being exploited. In other words, they use your Facebook friends and lack of experience to trick you. The chances are you will be more likely to believe something if you see it has been or appears to be endorsed by a few of your facebook friends. Now many people will state its Facebook’s duty to keep these types of landmines out of your news feed, and I agree with them. However, since Facebook seems to be unable to completely rid your feed of this issue, you have to learn what’s safe to click and what may not be. Hopefully this article will help you in that mission.

Some of these fake video links use titles and text that is pulled from popular, real world news headlines; celebrity gossip, Erotic topics or funny wide spread YouTube videos. Others are just plain made up and designed to grab your attention with something shocking, sexual, disgusting or sad. Many of them will try to urge you to click them by claiming the video is exclusive or they will use terms like OMG, WOW or Shocking with the intention of making you feel you must not miss seeing what’s offered. Since the links usually pop up in your news feed as a message from one of your friends, (Normally from a Friend Who Already Fell for the Scam), you may think the video or message is legit and click on it. Below I have included 5 example fake video scams. You can use these examples to familiarize yourself with what these types of fake video scams look like.

Examples – Video Scam Messages

Though the above videos may look somewhat legit they are not. In fact, if you take some time to closely look at them, some red flags should pop right out at you. Often times these videos have really bad grammar, multiple misspellings, odd looking urls, explicit images for the thumbnails and thumbnails with “video Play Buttons” in the wrong location. These are all signs that something isn’t right and you should stop and think before you click.

Another way you know these videos aren’t legit is they never load or play within Facebook like normal Facebook videos or YouTube videos. If you do make the mistake of clicking one you will notice you are quickly transferred to some unknown external website. Sometimes the websites themselves have been designed to look like Facebook, YouTube or other well know news websites and that can make the scam harder to spot after you’ve click. However, before you click anything on the site you get taken too, take a few seconds to look up at your web browsers address bar. If the link you clicked was suppose to show you a video on NBC, then you should see http://www.nbc.com at the beginning of the web address shown in your web browsers address bar. Same goes for YouTube or Facebook or any other well know or verified video or news source. If you see, (Facbok.com or YouCube.blogspot.com or anything thing similar), immediately close the browser to get away from the site. Below I have included a few examples of fake video websites. Use these examples to familiarize yourself with what these Fakes look like.

Examples – Fake Video Websites

The example websites shown above are typical fake video scams. These websites often trick Facebook users in to exploiting their own accounts to spread spam, survey scams and sometimes even worse malware. Most of these scams use the same methods of exploitation over and over Such as: Click-jacking, Web browser plugins, Fake Adobe Flash Updates or sometimes they force you to manually share the spam. In the end they all achieve the same goal by getting Facebook users to post messages to their friends stating they have seen a video or read a shocking report they really haven’t. While these messages are posted usually behind the victims back, the victims are led off to the main purpose of the scam, which is to get them to complete bogus surveys or offers net Scam Artists 1 to 3 dollars per survey completed. Sometimes the scams go beyond just that goal and can end in virus infected computers and id theft.

The Click-jacking Method

When the victim reaches the external website and tries to play what appears to be the video they want to see, by clicking the play button, their click is invisibly hijacked and produces a “like” or “Recommendation” in their name, for all of their friends to see on Facebook, in their news feed or ticker. While the victim’s friends are baited, the victim is quickly taken to another page or website and told they must complete a survey to continue.

The Web browser plugin Method

When the victim reaches the external website they see what looks like a video play box, but are told they need to install a special YouTube or premium content video plugin. The Fake browser plugins compromise Facebook user’s accounts and causes them to repeatedly spam their friends by Tagging or Checking them into multiple posting of the fake video or news link. Since “Check Ins” and “Tagging” work similar on Facebook this will allow the scam to spread from the victim’s friends to the victim’s friend’s friends effectively. While all the tagging and posting is going on behind the victims back, the victim is quickly taken to another page or website and told they most complete a survey to continue.

The Fake Adobe Flash Update Method

When the victim reaches the external website they see what looks like a video play box, but are told they need to install an updated version of adobe flash player. The Fake Adobe Updates work similar to the browser plugins except they can be much more malicious. Beside spamming the victims Facebook friends, they may install information stealing viruses, place ads on the victims Facebook page, redirect the user to various Survey pages, monitor the victims browsing habits or even worse, Lock the victim out of their Facebook account altogether. Though the scam artist may still want you to fill out a survey so he can make a quick buck off of you, this method goes far beyond a simple survey scam.

The Manually Spam Method

When the victim reaches the external website they see what looks like a video play box, but they are told they cannot see or play the video until they manually share the spam message and website to their Facebook friends. A Share button is usually shown and once it’s clicked victims are prompted to share what they haven’t even seen yet. Once the victim goes along with this ploy, they are quickly taken to another page or website and told they most complete a survey to continue.

The End Result

In most cases there is no shocking sexy disgusting sad video or story to see in these scams and most victims simply are left wishing they had never bother clicking through it. Sometimes a scam artist will give his marks what’s promised, but the Fact is it’s usually nothing the mark couldn’t find by simply searching Google or YouTube directly, no money making schemes, scams, spam, malware or embarrassment involved.

The Proactive Approach To Not Getting Scammed
Now that you have a basic understanding of how these scams work and what to watch out for, it is advised that you practice a pro-active approach to dealing with them on Facebook. It is better to avoid these malicious items in the first place, rather than to suffer the frustration of having to clean up your Facebook profile or computer after you have fallen victim to one of them. In general you should refrain from clicking or following random untrustworthy links on Facebook. Always remember it is better to ask a friend if they have posted a particular message or item before you simply click through it, especially if the message or item appears to be strange in nature. Links to spam, scams and other malicious elements may appear in your news feed, inbox, and chat window or event list. Be wise: look, read and inspect all links before you click them and if you make the mistake of clicking something questionable it’s never too late to simply close your browser to avoid being trapped further. As a general rule of thumb you should be sure to keep your Anti-Virus software, Operating System & Browsers up to date at all times.

Do Not Download Browser Plugins or Adobe Flash Player Updates via unknown websites. The best place to download Chrome Extensions or plugins is Here: https://chrome.google.com/webstore/category/extensions and Firefox is here: https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/ . Always download Adobe Flash Updates from here: http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/.

It is advised that Facebook users practice retrieving their news and other related information from well known, reputable mainstream media outlets. Most well known media outlets have Facebook pages you can become a fan of and receive there updates right in your news feed 24 hours a day. Below I will list a few for reference…

Protecting Yourself From Tag Spam On Facebook
Since you will not be able to stop some of your friends from falling for scams/spam that use Tagging or Checkins to spread, it is advised that you use a proactive approach to stopping the scam/spam from spreading to your other friends, with your name attached to it. The simplest way to do this is to turn on “Timeline Review“. Turning on “Timeline Review” will allow you to review all of the post your friends “Tag” you in, before they go to your timeline, profile or into your friends news feeds. Please see the How to Turn On “Timeline Review” Section for more information.

How to Turn On “Timeline Review
If you would like to review posts and photos you’re tagged in before they go on your profile/timeline, turn on Profile (Timeline) Review.

  1. Click the Account Menu, (White Upside Down Triangle), at the top right of any Facebook page and choose Privacy Settings.
  2. Scroll down the Privacy Settings page to the heading How Tags Work and click the “Edit Settings” link to the right.
  3. In the “How Tags Work” dialog box that opens, click the heading “Timeline Review“.
  4. In the “Timeline Review” dialog box that opens, read the information provided then select “Enabled” from the options button show to the left.
  5. Finally click “Back” then “Done” to close the tag settings.

Example Dialog Boxes

Facebook Profile Clean Up – (Oops, You Fell For A Scam)
If you have fallen for a fake video scam, you need to remove any Likes, Web Browser Plugins or Fake Adobe Flash Updates you may have installed as a result of the scam. You also need to delete any wall messages you have posted to your Facebook friends as soon as possible. If you have seen your friends post fake video scam, take a little time to report the spam to Facebook.
How to recover from spamming browser plugins or fake adobe updates:

First: Start by checking for and removing any suspicious browser plugins. Below I have included links to both Chrome & Firefox’s help topics for removing Browser extensions or plugins.

Uninstall extensions (Chrome)
http://support.google.com/chrome/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=113907
Uninstalling add-ons (Firefox)
http://kb.mozillazine.org/Uninstalling_extensions

If you believe you have downloaded and installed a Fake Adobe Flash Update you should update your Anti-Virus Software and RUN A FULL SCAN with it immediately. The fake updates are always malicious and usually push really bad viruses or information stealing Trojans on to victims computers. It is advised that you not only scan your computer with the main Anti-Virus software you currently have, but also run a secondary scan with and independent AV scanner or Malware Scanner. Below I have listed a few free Online AV scanners and 2 highly recommend Malware Scanners.

TrendMicro’s HouseCall
http://housecall.trendmicro.com/

Panda ActiveScan
http://www.pandasecurity.com/homeusers/solutions/activescan/

Bitdefender QuickScan
http://www.bitdefender.com/scanner/online/free.html

ESET Online Scanner
http://www.eset.com/us/online-scanner/

Malwarebytes Anti-Malware (Highly Recommend To Go With Your Main AV.)
Has a 30 day trial Offer for the full version but you can use the free version forever.
http://download.cnet.com/Malwarebytes-Anti-Malware/3000-8022_4-10804572.html

Hitman Pro (Cloud Based Anti-Malware Scanner)
Hitman will scan and clean your computer of Malware 1 time for free. If it doesn’t find anything, you don’t have to install the 30 day trial.
http://www.surfright.nl/en

————–

Second: After you are sure you have removed any malware you may have installed as a result of being scammed, you should change your Facebook Password just in case.

How do I reset my password?
https://www.facebook.com/help/?faq=213395615347144#How-do-I-reset-my-password?
————–

Third: Finally you should delete any wall messages you have posted to your Facebook friends and or report the spam to Facebook.

Here is how to remove a post from from your Facebook wall or Timeline

How do I remove a Wall post or story?
https://www.facebook.com/help/?faq=203594616344678#How-do-I-remove-a-Wall-post-or-story?

How do I hide a story on my timeline?
https://www.facebook.com/help/?faq=261211860580476#How-do-I-hide-a-story-on-my-timeline?

The link below shows you how to Report Abuse on Facebook. It covers reporting a post as spam.

How to Report Abuse
https://www.facebook.com/help/reportlinks

Did You Fill Out The Survey Scam?
It is important that you never hand over any personal information, such as: email addresses, cell number, name, home address or credit card numbers, to these types of scams. If you do, you are simply setting yourself up to be spammed or worse. Identity theft is big business and handing over some of the info these bogus surveys ask for, will make you a victim of that business. If you have made the mistake of handing over a credit card number, you should call your bank or credit provider as soon as possible to have them remove or dispute the charges that have or maybe made to the card. If you’ve given your cell number to any of these types of Scams, it is important that you call your cell carrier ASAP to have any charges you may receive stopped. If you begin to receive unsolicited phone calls, you should take note of the calls, record names and numbers, and then report the calls to the FCC or other proper authorities.

Examples – Survey Scams

Stay Sharp and Be Safe, Avoid Facebook scams..

~Black Knight

My Open Letter To You, Facebook & Whoever wants to read it


My Open Letter To You, Facebook & Whoever wants to read it:

It has come to my attention that quite a few people are getting verbally abused by their “friends” when they try to explain the reason why sick child hoaxes shouldn’t be shared. I’ve seen people be told to shut the “****” up or called nasty names and heartless because they have simply stated the message with the photos is false and that the photos should not be shared for that reason. It’s actually a very sad thing to see and it is a shame responsible users have been forced into this situation. Facebook has stated they are going to improve the system for reporting these types of photos but sadly I have not seen any improvement in how this situation is being handled. Actually it’s gotten worse since their statement and by my “fuzzy” calculations nearly 1% of all Facebook users have spread these photos. That’s means near 8,000,000 people either have fallen for the lie, or have willingly excepted a lie because they want to be or feel sympathetic and many of them even fail to understand that the pictures have been place on Facebook and spread around without the child’s parents permission. Seriously, You think you’re being sympathetic by spreading a lie around with the picture of someone Else’s sick child? You’re “Fu**ing Kidding Me, right?

I digress…

Whether the pictures are being used simply as pranks, used to dupe users into liking pages, friending profiles or subscribing to con-men doesn’t matter to me anymore. The way Facebook seems to or appears to be handling the issue leads me and several of my colleagues to believe they are secretly getting something out of this type of activity, like increased site activity numbers or ad displays, and that my friends makes this extremely disheartening to me. I hope we are wrong and this is simply just an oversight on their part but I, just like many of you are tired of the situation. We do not sign into Facebook to have our feeds blasted with this type of thing, to be abused by the people we may have in our friends list, or to be abused by random commenters to a con they apparently can’t comprehend is a con. Whether it be sick children or puppies, it needs to be handled because in my view it has turned into a prolific con that is bound to get worse on Facebook.

To the people who have “friends” abusing them over the issue, I’m sorry. I’m sorry to see so many people are unwilling to accept the truth, BUT, as my old mom would say: “You can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make him drink. -Shoot the horse and move on before you die of thrust as well”. I wish that I could do more to help you, but the truth is I’m just like you. Just another Facebook user who loves the site but hates the Fact the site doesn’t seem to love him back at times. If you see a person post any of the sick child hoaxes and you feel they will be open to your information, give it to them and them alone. If you think they don’t care about it and will continue to do it, either unsubscribe to their updates so you won’t see the pictures and trash they post or give them the boot completely, unfriend them. As far as reporting the photos, Facebook says you help them remove the stuff by reporting it. So far, that looks like a lie, (Sorry Facebook, Just Calling It As I See It), but I guess it’s better to follow that instruction, then do nothing at all.

Signed,
Old Scam Hunter – ~Mr. Black Knight

SCAM ALERT – Scam Leverage Whitney Houston’s Death


<< SCAM ALERT – Scam Leverage Whitney Houston’s Death >>
**Share & Like To Spread This Warning**

Scam Artist have already begun to use Whitney Houston’s Death as bait in a few scams on Facebook and Twitter. Watch out for links or messages with the subject line of “I Cried watching this video. RIP Whitney Houston”. The message and links lead to “ClickJacking” and Survey Scams. Remember: Only get your news and updates about the story from mainstream media outlets. (Please Visit Our Blog Report For More Info)>> http://www.thebulldogestate.com/2012/02/keep-eye-out-for-whitney-houston-scams.html

Warning – Avoid Messages From Friends About Profile Viewers


ATTENTION: DO NOT believe messages that come from your friends and claim they have seen who viewed, stalked or copied information from their Facebook Profile. They DID NOT and CAN NOT see that information. Friends who send those types of message have been tricked by Scam Artist and now the Scam Artist is trying to use them to trick YOU.

Keep An Eye Out for Whitney Houston Scams


Whitney Houston was found dead Saturday at a Beverly Hills, California, hotel. The cause of her death is currently unknown and being investigated. Unfortunately, as usual, you should expect Scam Artists to use this sad news as bait to draw individuals into their scams on Facebook and other places around the web. Scammers may try to spread Viruses, fake YouTube Plugins, bogus Adobe Flash Player Updates, Malicious Browser extensions, Rogue Facebook Applications and other Malware using fake videos and news reports as the bait. Avoid questionable search results, videos, links and websites. Only get your news and updates about the story from mainstream media outlets.

**Resources**


Scam Reports

Cybercriminals Leverage Whitney Houston’s Death (02-13-2012)
http://blog.trendmicro.com/cybercriminals-leverage-whitney-houstons-death/

Mainstream Media Outlets (Real Information)

Report: Houston’s Body Was Underwater
http://www.myfoxphilly.com/dpp/news/local_news/report:-houston%E2%80%99s-body-was-underwater

Prescription drugs found in Whitney Houston’s hotel room, report says
http://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/2012/02/12/whitney-houston-dead-prescription-drugs-drowned-autopsy/

Singer Whitney Houston dies at 48
http://edition.cnn.com/2012/02/11/showbiz/whitney-houston-dead/?hpt=hp_t1

Whitney Houston, Pop Superstar, Dies at 48
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/12/arts/music/whitney-houston-dies.html?

Police: Houston Found Dead in Her Hotel Room
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_kLw9tTvcw4&list=UU52X5wxOL_s5yw0dQk7NtgA&index=5&feature=plcp

Fans ‘Speechless’ Over Houston’s Death
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cH0M9pdgdAw&list=UU52X5wxOL_s5yw0dQk7NtgA&index=7&feature=plcp

~Mr. Black Knight

Facebook LIKEJACK ALERT – Megan Fox Leaks Dirty Tape.


<< SCAM ALERT – Megan Fox Leaks Dirty Tape. >>
**Share & Like To Spread This Warning**

Scam Message:
Megan Fox Leaks Dirty Tape! She said she’d never make one, but we’ve got footage of this star getting wild![Link] 

Scam Type:
Fake Video, LikeJacking or Recommendation-Jack, Survey Scam

What Makes It A Scam:

Victims are tricked into clicking a link which they think will take them to some shocking video or celebrity Sex-tape. When the victim reaches the external website and tries to play the video by clicking the play button, their click is hijacked and produces a “like” or “Recommendation” in their name, for all of their friends to see on Facebook, in their news feed or ticker. While the aforementioned has taken place, the victim is quickly re-directed to another fake video site that tells them they need to do a survey or offer to see the video. Normally there is no video on the site, but if there is, it is usually a video which can be found on YouTube without doing bogus surveys.

What Happens If I Believe The Scam:

If you click the link in scam message shown in this report you will be taken to the Fake Video site show in the examples below. Once you try to play the video by clicking the play button, your click is invisibly hijacked. Your friends on Facebook are shown that you have “liked” or “Recommend” the Megan Fox video while you are quickly re-directed to another fake video site that tells you to do a survey or offer to see the video. There is no video on the website. The fake surveys or offers net Scam Artists 1 to 3 dollars per survey completed and you’ve just unknowingly helped the scam artist spread his ruse to your friends. Please see the examples below and the extended information below that.

Example Scam Message

Example Fake Video

  Example What Really Happens When You Click

Example Survey Scam



Example Bogus Survey

What Click-Jacking Means.
Click-Jacking or Like-Jacking are terms used to describe an attack that tricks Facebook users into clicking a hidden “Like Button” or “Comment Box” on External web pages. Most Facebook users are unaware that a like/click-jacking has taken place due to the fact the “Like Button” or “Comment Box” is usually hidden behind a fake video play button or some other object on the web page. Users will instinctively click these fake objects, thinking they are harmless. Many Facebook users end up leaving the Scam sitting on their wall for days because they never knew it happened. Their friends come along and fall right in to the same trap once they click. AVOID IT. Read and share this with your friends.

I Fell For It – How Do I Clean Up The Mess:

If you have fallen victim to a Like-Jacking or Click-Jacking scam, you need to clean up your facebook profile immediately. You can do this by simply removing the spam “Like” or “Comment” made to your wall. This will ensure that you do not continue to assist the scam artist in spreading his ruse to your friends and even further throughout the facebook network. .

How do I remove a Wall post or story?
https://www.facebook.com/help/?faq=203594616344678#How-do-I-remove-a-Wall-post-or-story?

How do I hide a story on my timeline?
https://www.facebook.com/help/?faq=261211860580476#How-do-I-hide-a-story-on-my-timeline?

The link below shows you how to Report Abuse On Facebook. It covers reporting a post as spam.

How to Report Abuse
https://www.facebook.com/help/reportlinks

Did You Fill Out The Survey Scam.
It is important that you never hand over any personal information, such as: email addresses, cell number, name, home address or credit card numbers, to these types of scams. If you do, you are simply setting yourself up to be spammed or worse. Identity theft is big business and handing over some of the info these bogus surveys ask for, will make you a victim of that business. If you have made the mistake of handing over a credit card number, you should call your bank or credit provider as soon as possible to have them remove or dispute the charges that have or maybe made to the card. If you’ve given your cell number to any of these types of Scams, it is important that you call your cell carrier ASAP to have any charges you may receive stopped. If you begin to receive unsolicited phone calls, you should take note of the calls, record names and numbers, then report the calls to the FCC or other proper authorities..

Have You Been Like-Jacked Lately? What It Means and How To Avoid it.

 
~Mr. Black Knight

Facebook SCAM ALERT – Rogue Application – What Does Your Name Look Like In Chinese Writing.


<< SCAM ALERT – What your Name looks like in Chinese >>
**Share & Like To Spread This Warning**

Scam Message:

What does your Name look like in Chinese writing? Find out Here –>[Link] 

Scam Type:
Novelty Entertainment Bait, Rogue Application, Survey Scam, Profile Information Theft

What Makes It A Scam:

Facebook users are tricked into installing a Rogue Application that is disguised as novelty enjoyment. The Rogue application then abuses the permission given to it by posting to the users wall without their knowledge. While the application is doing that the user is re-directed to fake content areas and told they must complete Surveys as a Security or Identity Check.
What Happens If I Believe The Scam:
If you fall for the ploy and click the link given in the scam message on Facebook, you will be tricked into giving a Rogue Facebook Application permission to post to your wall without your knowledge. While it’s doing that, it also takes some time to accesses quite a bit of your Facebook profile information.

The Application Accesses This Information From your Facebook Profile:
Your Basic information which includes: Name, Profile Picture, Gender, Networks, User ID, List of Friends, and any other information you’ve made public

They Application also access a few sets of Non-Basic information which includes: About Me, Birthday, Education History, Likes, Music, TV, Movies, Books and Quotes.

Here are screen-caps of the application installed and the profile data it accessed..

Screenshot #1 – Applications Dashboard


Screenshot #2 – Data Access Log

While the application is accessing and possibly storing all that information from your profile and re-posting the same or similar novelty bait message to your friends, behind your back, you are led to another Facebook page and told you must complete a survey or offer to pass into the “Hidden Content Area“. The fake surveys or offers net Scam Artists 1 to 3 dollars per survey completed. The process is a fraud. There is no hidden content. Please see the examples included below and please read the extended info included below the examples.

Example Scam Message Type 1

Example Application Install Screen #1
 The Survey Scam

Example Bogus Survey

How Could I have Known It Was A Scam:
These types of Facebook applications all have two things in common. Many of them have no drop screens or informational preview, (Meaning: They offer you little to no information about the app you are about to install and no Privacy Policy or company contact info. They simply rush you through the install process.) They also all request the “Post To Facebook As Me” permission up front, on the “Application Request For Permission” Screen. This permission allows the application to post to your Facebook profile at any time, without you implicitly telling it to do so. (Meaning: It’s the Scammers Delight) -As a general rule of thumb you should Personally review all Facebook applications before you install them. Do not install applications simply because it appears friends have used it.

What Can I Do To Protect Myself From Facebook Scams:
  1. Make sure your computer’s OS, Browsers and Anti-Virus software is up-to-date and keep them that way.
  2. Keep your passwords to yourself. (Never Give Them TO ANYONE, NO MATTER WHAT THEY SAY.)
  3. Don’t Friend everybody on Facebook.
  4. If you are NOT going to use Facebook apps, turn the application platform off. If you ARE going to use Facebook apps, make sure you thoroughly review them before you install ANY of them.
  5. Don’t trust your friends on Facebook or any other website/social network. Don’t randomly click every link OR Facebook Application they throw your way and make sure you don’t go around facebook or the web clicking everything you see. You should be relatively sure of were a link is going to take you, before you click it..

I Fell For It – How Do I Clean Up The Mess:

If you have fallen for the scam, you need to remove any Facebook Applications you may have installed as a result of the scam and delete any wall messages you have posted as soon as possible. If you have seen your friends post the scam, take a little time to report the spam to Facebook. Please see the resources below.

How do I remove or delete an app from my account?
https://www.facebook.com/help/?faq=170585223002660#How-do-I-remove-or-delete-an-app-from-my-account?

How do I remove a Wall post or story?
https://www.facebook.com/help/?faq=203594616344678#How-do-I-remove-a-Wall-post-or-story?

The link below shows you how to Report Abuse On Facebook. It covers reporting a post as spam.

How to Report Abuse
https://www.facebook.com/help/reportlinks

Did You Fill Out The Survey Scam.
It is important that you never hand over any personal information, such as: email addresses, cell number, name, home address or credit card numbers, to these types of scams. If you do, you are simply setting yourself up to be spammed or worse. Identity theft is big business and handing over some of the info these bogus surveys ask for, will make you a victim of that business. If you have made the mistake of handing over a credit card number, you should call your bank or credit provider as soon as possible to have them remove or dispute the charges that have or maybe made to the card. If you’ve given your cell number to any of these types of Scams, it is important that you call your cell carrier ASAP to have any charges you may receive stopped. If you begin to receive unsolicited phone calls, you should take note of the calls, record names and numbers, then report the calls to the FCC or other proper authorities..

 
~MBK

Facebook SCAM ALERT – Rogue Application – What Is The Most Sexy Thing About You.


<< SCAM ALERT – What’s The Sexiest Thing About You >>
**Share & Like To Spread This Warning**

Scam Message:
What is the most sexy thing about you? Dont be shy…Find out yours here…like I found out——–> ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ [Link] 

Scam Type:
Novelty Entertainment Bait, Rogue Application, Survey Scam, Profile Information Theft

What Makes It A Scam:

Facebook users are tricked into installing a novelty application for fun. The Application abuses the permission given to it by posting to the users wall without their knowledge. While the application is doing that the user is re-directed to fake content areas and told they must complete Surveys as a Security or Identity Check.
What Happens If I Believe The Scam:
If you fall for the ploy and click the link given in the scam message on Facebook, you will be tricked into giving a Rogue Facebook Application permission to post to your wall without your knowledge. While it’s doing that, it also takes some time to accesses quite a bit of your Facebook profile information.

The Application Accesses This Information From your Facebook Profile:
Your Basic information which includes: Name, Profile Picture, Gender, Networks, User ID, List of Friends, and any other information you’ve made public

They Application also access a few sets of Non-Basic information which includes: About Me, Birthday, Education History, Likes, Music, TV, Movies, Books and Quotes.

Here are screen-caps of the application installed and the profile data it accessed..

Screenshot #1 – Applications Dashboard


Screenshot #2 – Data Access Log

While the application is accessing and possibly storing all that information from your profile and re-posting the same or similar novelty bait message to your friends, behind your back, you are led to another Facebook page and told you must complete a survey or offer to pass into the “Hidden Content Area“. The fake surveys or offers net Scam Artists 1 to 3 dollars per survey completed. The process is a fraud. There is no hidden content. Please see the examples included below and please read the extended info included below the examples.

Example Scam Message Type 1
Example Application Install Screen #1
 The Survey Scam

Example Bogus Survey

How Could I have Known It Was A Scam:
These types of Facebook applications all have two things in common. Many of them have no drop screens or informational preview, (Meaning: They offer you little to no information about the app you are about to install and no Privacy Policy or company contact info. They simply rush you through the install process.) They also all request the “Post To Facebook As Me” permission up front, on the “Application Request For Permission” Screen. This permission allows the application to post to your Facebook profile at any time, without you implicitly telling it to do so. (Meaning: It’s the Scammers Delight) -As a general rule of thumb you should Personally review all Facebook applications before you install them. Do not install applications simply because it appears friends have used it.

What Can I Do To Protect Myself From Facebook Scams:
  1. Make sure your computer’s OS, Browsers and Anti-Virus software is up-to-date and keep them that way.
  2. Keep your passwords to yourself. (Never Give Them TO ANYONE, NO MATTER WHAT THEY SAY.)
  3. Don’t Friend everybody on Facebook.
  4. If you are NOT going to use Facebook apps, turn the application platform off. If you ARE going to use Facebook apps, make sure you thoroughly review them before you install ANY of them.
  5. Don’t trust your friends on Facebook or any other website/social network. Don’t randomly click every link OR Facebook Application they throw your way and make sure you don’t go around facebook or the web clicking everything you see. You should be relatively sure of were a link is going to take you, before you click it..

I Fell For It – How Do I Clean Up The Mess:

If you have fallen for the scam, you need to remove any Facebook Applications you may have installed as a result of the scam and delete any wall messages you have posted as soon as possible. If you have seen your friends post the scam, take a little time to report the spam to Facebook. Please see the resources below.

How do I remove or delete an app from my account?
https://www.facebook.com/help/?faq=170585223002660#How-do-I-remove-or-delete-an-app-from-my-account?

How do I remove a Wall post or story?
https://www.facebook.com/help/?faq=203594616344678#How-do-I-remove-a-Wall-post-or-story?

The link below shows you how to Report Abuse On Facebook. It covers reporting a post as spam.

How to Report Abuse
https://www.facebook.com/help/reportlinks

Did You Fill Out The Survey Scam.
It is important that you never hand over any personal information, such as: email addresses, cell number, name, home address or credit card numbers, to these types of scams. If you do, you are simply setting yourself up to be spammed or worse. Identity theft is big business and handing over some of the info these bogus surveys ask for, will make you a victim of that business. If you have made the mistake of handing over a credit card number, you should call your bank or credit provider as soon as possible to have them remove or dispute the charges that have or maybe made to the card. If you’ve given your cell number to any of these types of Scams, it is important that you call your cell carrier ASAP to have any charges you may receive stopped. If you begin to receive unsolicited phone calls, you should take note of the calls, record names and numbers, then report the calls to the FCC or other proper authorities..

 
~MBK

Facebook SCAM ALERT – Rogue Application – What Sexy Superpower Can You Get In The future..


<< SCAM ALERT – What sexy superpower Can you get >>
**Share & Like To Spread This Warning**

Scam Message:
wow nice app… must try… What sexy superpower Can you get in future? Dont be shy!!!….Find out here ——–> ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ [Link] 

Scam Type:
Novelty Entertainment Bait, Rogue Application, Survey Scam, Profile Information Theft

What Makes It A Scam:

Facebook users are tricked into installing a novelty application for fun. The Application abuses the permission given to it by posting to the users wall without their knowledge. While the application is doing that the user is re-directed to fake content areas and told they must complete Surveys as a Security or Identity Check.
What Happens If I Believe The Scam:
If you fall for the ploy and click the link given in the scam message on Facebook, you will be tricked into giving a Rogue Facebook Application permission to post to your wall without your knowledge. While it’s doing that, it also takes some time to accesses quite a bit of your Facebook profile information.

The Application Accesses This Information From your Facebook Profile:
Your Basic information which includes: Name, Profile Picture, Gender, Networks, User ID, List of Friends, and any other information you’ve made public

They Application also access a few sets of Non-Basic information which includes: About Me, Birthday, Education History, Likes, Music, TV, Movies, Books and Quotes.

Here are screen-caps of the application installed and the profile data it accessed..

Screenshot #1 – Applications Dashboard


Screenshot #2 – Data Access Log

While the application is accessing and possibly storing all that information from your profile and re-posting the same or similar novelty bait message to your friends, behind your back, you are led to another Facebook page and told you must complete a survey or offer to pass into the “Hidden Content Area“. The fake surveys or offers net Scam Artists 1 to 3 dollars per survey completed. The process is a fraud. There is no hidden content. Please see the examples included below and please read the extended info included below the examples.

Example Scam Message Type 1
Example Application Install Screen #1
 The Survey Scam

Example Bogus Survey

How Could I have Known It Was A Scam:
These types of Facebook applications all have two things in common. Many of them have no drop screens or informational preview, (Meaning: They offer you little to no information about the app you are about to install and no Privacy Policy or company contact info. They simply rush you through the install process.) They also all request the “Post To Facebook As Me” permission up front, on the “Application Request For Permission” Screen. This permission allows the application to post to your Facebook profile at any time, without you implicitly telling it to do so. (Meaning: It’s the Scammers Delight) -As a general rule of thumb you should Personally review all Facebook applications before you install them. Do not install applications simply because it appears friends have used it.

What Can I Do To Protect Myself From Facebook Scams:
  1. Make sure your computer’s OS, Browsers and Anti-Virus software is up-to-date and keep them that way.
  2. Keep your passwords to yourself. (Never Give Them TO ANYONE, NO MATTER WHAT THEY SAY.)
  3. Don’t Friend everybody on Facebook.
  4. If you are NOT going to use Facebook apps, turn the application platform off. If you ARE going to use Facebook apps, make sure you thoroughly review them before you install ANY of them.
  5. Don’t trust your friends on Facebook or any other website/social network. Don’t randomly click every link OR Facebook Application they throw your way and make sure you don’t go around facebook or the web clicking everything you see. You should be relatively sure of were a link is going to take you, before you click it..

I Fell For It – How Do I Clean Up The Mess:

If you have fallen for the scam, you need to remove any Facebook Applications you may have installed as a result of the scam and delete any wall messages you have posted as soon as possible. If you have seen your friends post the scam, take a little time to report the spam to Facebook. Please see the resources below.

How do I remove or delete an app from my account?
https://www.facebook.com/help/?faq=170585223002660#How-do-I-remove-or-delete-an-app-from-my-account?

How do I remove a Wall post or story?
https://www.facebook.com/help/?faq=203594616344678#How-do-I-remove-a-Wall-post-or-story?

The link below shows you how to Report Abuse On Facebook. It covers reporting a post as spam.

How to Report Abuse
https://www.facebook.com/help/reportlinks

Did You Fill Out The Survey Scam.
It is important that you never hand over any personal information, such as: email addresses, cell number, name, home address or credit card numbers, to these types of scams. If you do, you are simply setting yourself up to be spammed or worse. Identity theft is big business and handing over some of the info these bogus surveys ask for, will make you a victim of that business. If you have made the mistake of handing over a credit card number, you should call your bank or credit provider as soon as possible to have them remove or dispute the charges that have or maybe made to the card. If you’ve given your cell number to any of these types of Scams, it is important that you call your cell carrier ASAP to have any charges you may receive stopped. If you begin to receive unsolicited phone calls, you should take note of the calls, record names and numbers, then report the calls to the FCC or other proper authorities..

 
~MBK

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